A blog about Big Cats, species awareness, conservation, news & events, as well as issues regarding exotic cats in captivity and the wild. Big cats represent the ultimate predator, beauty and vitality. Despite being known as one of the most beautiful creatures in the world, these cats are decreasing in the wild. Due to many reasons, mostly habitat destruction, prey reduction, poaching & hunting for their parts, wild cat populations are smaller in numbers than they were before. We humans, as the one responsible for their destruction, should act now so that these beautiful cats do not disappear from the face of the Earth.

Big Cat Network Animal Blog DISCLAIMER
Clouded Leopard by cuatrok77 Clouded Leopard by cuatrok77 Clouded Leopard by cuatrok77

Clouded Leopard by cuatrok77

Female African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) in boughs of yellow fever acacia tree, Lake Nakuru, Kenya.
photo by Elliott Neep Female African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) in boughs of yellow fever acacia tree, Lake Nakuru, Kenya.
photo by Elliott Neep Female African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) in boughs of yellow fever acacia tree, Lake Nakuru, Kenya.
photo by Elliott Neep

Female African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) in boughs of yellow fever acacia tree, Lake Nakuru, Kenya.

photo by Elliott Neep

earthandanimals:

CUTE TIGER CUBS - Robbed from the Cradle (Video covers why cub petting is terrible)

This IS IMPORTANT. Spread this like wildfire.

For those who don't know why cub petting is wrong, can you care to explain why it is? I have never heard of anything like that and I'm just curious.

Cub petting (or pay to play schemes - same thing) is where people go and pet big cat cubs. Often, the public does not know that this is animal cruelty; facilities usually lie to people telling them that these cubs are orphans or they’ve been rescued, this is not the case. Big cats like lions or tigers, for example, are bred and inbred (ex: white tigers, white lions) -excessively and constantly, which causes diseases like cancer- to produce cubs that are put into this cruel industry. People then pay money to these irresponsible and misleading organizations to pet these cubs. Constantly being touched and moved around, woken up and drugged and not fed properly puts a lot of stress & damage on these cubs’ little bodies and they can get sick very easily. Then, when they are older and more dangerous to be in contact with humans, they are sent to roadside zoos, or run down facilities where they will be put in small cages with concrete floors for the rest of their lives OR they will be sold to be killed for their parts. 

Denied of their natural behaviors, denied of their mother, denied of a happy, healthy life.

Their entire life, they will be forced to live in abusive conditions. What kind of life is that for such a beautiful animal? Why would people do this? The answer is simple: money. The facilities that do this don’t care for the well being of these animals, they only want money and they will do anything to get it. 

I highly encourage you to watch this video, and then tell me that you see nothing wrong with it, I dare you. 

Also, for more information as well as a resource, please read this

Everything I have said is not against you or to insult you, so please do not be offended. I am just merely explaining the fact that cub petting = animal cruelty. 

Brother (left) and sister Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) searching for prey on the open grasslands. Lewa, Central Kenya.
photo by David & Shiela Glatz Brother (left) and sister Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) searching for prey on the open grasslands. Lewa, Central Kenya.
photo by David & Shiela Glatz Brother (left) and sister Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) searching for prey on the open grasslands. Lewa, Central Kenya.
photo by David & Shiela Glatz

Brother (left) and sister Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) searching for prey on the open grasslands. Lewa, Central Kenya.

photo by David & Shiela Glatz

panthxra:

nataliefree:

For anyone interested in meeting these cubs, feel free to message me! It’s a great cause, despite all of the hate going on. Sadly, a lot of rumors have been made up but I was there to see everything myself and the tigers are so happy and they’re being spoiled rotten. It’s wonderful that this beautiful animal is being kept alive (:

lol nice

I'm not telling my followers I was wrong for petting cubs, because I wasn't. You're being ridiculous.

panthxra:

I’m being ridiculous? Me along with all my followers who know cub petting is detrimental? Me and my followers along with thousands upon thousands of people who know cub petting is wrong? I gave you several sources so you could learn the truth about the pay-to-play industry, but you’re having none of it. You asked me to delete your picture because you can’t handle being called out on your problematic crap. And I’m being ridiculous. There’s a reason you’re not allowed to hold cubs at responsible zoos. And there’s a reason there’s a proposed ban in New York that will ban cub petting throughout the state; I’m not just pulling these things out of my ass. Cub petting a real problem. You’re being incredibly selfish and closed-minded and in denial, and at the same time calling me ridiculous. I can assure you that am not the one who’s being ridiculous here, hun. 

Fishing Cat by Anne-Marie Kalus Fishing Cat by Anne-Marie Kalus Fishing Cat by Anne-Marie Kalus

Fishing Cat by Anne-Marie Kalus

African Lion (Panthera leo nubica), pride sitting in a row watching nearby prey, Masai Mara, Kenya
photo by Elliott Neep African Lion (Panthera leo nubica), pride sitting in a row watching nearby prey, Masai Mara, Kenya
photo by Elliott Neep African Lion (Panthera leo nubica), pride sitting in a row watching nearby prey, Masai Mara, Kenya
photo by Elliott Neep

African Lion (Panthera leo nubica), pride sitting in a row watching nearby prey, Masai Mara, Kenya

photo by Elliott Neep

photo by Hali Sowle

Margay Cats are small wild cats that spend most of their lives up in the trees. Often confused with their slightly large cousins the Ocelot’s they have specialized ankle joints that allow the Margay to make 180 degree turns on the branches of trees and lets them move through the treetops very much like squirrels do where as Ocelots rarely leave the ground.
photo by Hali Sowle

Margay Cats are small wild cats that spend most of their lives up in the trees. Often confused with their slightly large cousins the Ocelot’s they have specialized ankle joints that allow the Margay to make 180 degree turns on the branches of trees and lets them move through the treetops very much like squirrels do where as Ocelots rarely leave the ground.
photo by Hali Sowle

Margay Cats are small wild cats that spend most of their lives up in the trees. Often confused with their slightly large cousins the Ocelot’s they have specialized ankle joints that allow the Margay to make 180 degree turns on the branches of trees and lets them move through the treetops very much like squirrels do where as Ocelots rarely leave the ground.

photo by Hali Sowle

Margay Cats are small wild cats that spend most of their lives up in the trees. Often confused with their slightly large cousins the Ocelot’s they have specialized ankle joints that allow the Margay to make 180 degree turns on the branches of trees and lets them move through the treetops very much like squirrels do where as Ocelots rarely leave the ground.